A new and unique approach to Oriental Medical Practice. Based on sound medical sciences (courses from DNM), combined with our Oriental Medical Program, candidate may apply for OMD status.

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; simplified Chinese: 中医; traditional Chinese: 中醫; pinyin: zhōng yī; literally "Chinese medicine") is a broad range of medicine practices sharing common concepts which have been developed in China and are based on a tradition of more than 5,000 years, including various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, massage (Tui na), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy.

The doctrines of Chinese medicine are rooted in books such as the Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon and the Treatise on Cold Damage, as well as in cosmological notions like yin-yang and the five phases. Starting in the 1950s, these precepts were modernized in the People's Republic of China so as to integrate many anatomical and pathological notions with modern scientific medicine. Nonetheless, some of its methods, including the model of the body, or concept of disease, are not supported by modern evidence-based medicine.

TCM's view of the body places little emphasis on anatomical structures, but is mainly concerned with the identification of functional entities (which regulate digestion, breathing, aging etc.). While health is perceived as harmonious interaction of these entities and the outside world, disease is interpreted as a disharmony in interaction. TCM diagnosis includes in tracing symptoms to patterns of an underlying disharmony, by measuring the pulse, inspecting the tongue, skin, eyes and by looking at the eating and sleeping habits of the patient as well as many other parameters.

  • This course requires an enrolment key
    DOCTORATE IN ACUPUNCTURE [D.Ac.]

    Prerequisite: A Licensed or Practicing Acupuncturist with training in the basic medical sciences (candidates transcripts will be reviewed and any deficiencies in the medical sciences can be achieved by courses in the School of Natural Medicine).

    This is an in depth study of the classics in relation to the principal meridians, submeridians and ancestral vessels, their pathogenesis and pathology. The original material for this course was obtained from Vietnam, once the intellectual seat of Chinese Medicine (Saigon University).

    Special techniques on the methods of puncture according to the classics. The traditional names of the antique points are examined.The Su Wen, Ling Shu and Nan King are referenced. No other course of this depth in a Western Language exists on planet earth. Text is used from the Vietnamese classics.

    COURSE CONTENTS

    PART I: THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF TCM & ACUPUNCTURE

    Lesson 1: Shamanism At the Roots of Chinese Medicine
    Lesson 2: Feng Shui - The Principles of "Wind and Water"
    Lesson 3: Feng Shui - The Wind and Water
    Lesson 4: TAOISM AND TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE (TCM)
    Lesson 5: THE SAGES OF CHINA
    Lesson 6: CHINESE SCRIPT & COMMUNICATION OF THOUGHT
    Lesson 7: CHINESE ASTROLOGY-ASTRONOMY
    Lesson 8: AIR OR CH'I IN CHINESE MEDICINE
    Lesson 9: FENG - The Meaning of Wind in Chinese Medicine
    Lesson 10: THE DOCTRINE OF THE TRIPARTATE YIN/YANG
    Lesson 11: WU-HSING, FIVE PHASE ENERGETICS
    Lesson 12: THE ALL IMPORTANT TRIPLE BURNER ENERGETICS
    Lesson 13: PATHOGENEISIS & PATHOLOGY IN CHINESE ACUPUNCTURE
    Lesson 14: CLASSIFICATION OF THE CHINGS
    Lesson 15: The ancestral vessels, their nature and symptomatology
    Lesson 16: The Lo Vessels
    Lesson 17: The Tendino-Muscular Meridians, Their Nature and Symptomatology
    Lesson 18: The Distinct Meridians, Their Nature and Symptomatology
    LESSON 19: THE ANTIQUE (Five Element) POINTS
    Lesson 20: Summing Up the Celestial Pivots
    • Msgr. Prof. [Dr. of Med.] Charles McWilliams Msgr. Prof. [Dr. of Med.] Charles McWilliams: Dulce Maria Corrales
    This course requires an enrolment key
    PART III: PRACTICE OF TCM

    LESSON 1: Pathology & Pathogenesis in TCM.
    LESSON 2: Examination of the Patient, Troubles of the Energy,
    Study of the symptoms.
    LESSON3: Examination of the Pulses.
    LESSON4: Examination of the Tongue. The Food Tract and its
    Ailments Internal.
    LESSON5: The Techniques of Acupuncture. The Needles, the Ancient laws, Methods of manipulation.
    LESSON6: The techniques of Moxibustion.
    LESSON7: The Eight Therapeutic Rules
    LESSON8: Differentiation of the Syndromes According to the Eight Principles and the Theory of Zang-Fu.
    LESSON9: The techniques of needling by Wu-Hsing (Law of the Five Elements)
    LESSON10: The techniques of the time to puncture by Zi Wu Liu Chu,
    Fei Teng Ba Fa, Ling Gui Ba Fa
    • Msgr. Prof. [Dr. of Med.] Charles McWilliams Msgr. Prof. [Dr. of Med.] Charles McWilliams: Dr. Anthony James
    This course requires an enrolment key
    In this course we explore the Asian approach to Herbal medicine and show similarities to Western Herbalism, allowing the student to gain from both methodologies.
  • PAIN RELIEF

    This example characterizes one of he best known effects of acupuncture that of relieving pain - its analgesic effect. Acupuncture is one of the quickest and most effective methods of relieving pain virtually irrespective of its cause. This remarkable property of acupuncture has been exploited to provide analgesia for many types of operations. Acupuncture is used not only for minor operations like draining abscesses and extraction of teeth, but also for major operations like brain surgery. Even open-heart surgery has been carried out painlessly with the help of just one acupuncture needle inserted in the upper arm.

    In China over a million operations have been carried out using only acupuncture analgesia. Thousands of women all over the world have been spared the agonies of labour pains by the use of acupuncture. A couple of needles inserted in the ankle and in points below the knee provide enough analgesia for a painless delivery. This aspect of acupuncture has received a great deal of publicity in recent years.