Orthomolecular nutrition aims to maintain human health through specific nutritional supplementation. The concept recognizes that due to heredity or chronic stress factors, certain individuals have vitamin/nutrient dependent disorders. The practice builds on the idea of an optimum nutritional environment in the body and suggests that diseases reflect deficiencies in this environment. Treatment for disease, according to this view, involves attempts to correct "imbalances or deficiencies based on individual biochemistry" by use of substances such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids, trace elements, fatty acids or even specific botanical substances. The findings behind orthomolecular medicine are supported by clinical and sound medical evidence and the therapy but has been ignored and even supressed. The validity of the orthomolecular approach as a form of medicine has been questioned since the 1970s in spite of its widespread use.

For example, the use of high dose vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, was approached with radical scepticism in the 1970s only to find today orthodoxy has caved based on hard and sound clinical evidence. Now, blood vitamin D levels for a routine lab test is accepted by primary care doctors. Old school medicals doctors from those times can only say "I told you so.!" We acknowledge, the same will occur for such compounds as vitamin C, thiamine, niacin, etc.

The approach is sometimes referred to as megavitamin therapy because its practice evolved out of, and in some cases still uses, doses of vitamins and minerals many times higher than the recommended dietary intake. Orthomolecular practitioners may also incorporate a variety of other styles of treatment into their approaches, including dietary restriction, allergic food avoidance, megadoses of non-vitamin nutrients and even some pharmaceutical drugs like metformin and methylene blue.  Othomolecular doctors have long argued that non-optimal levels and hereditary deficiency diseases of certain substances can cause health issues beyond simple vitamin deficiency and see balancing these substances as an integral part of health in such diseases as schizophrenia, epilepsy, subclinical scurvies, and even cancer. There are a host of illnesses that have been routinely cured by megadose vitamin therapy. 

Linus Pauling coined the term "orthomolecular" in the 1960s to mean "the right molecules in the right amounts" (ortho- in Greek implies "correct"). Practitioners of orthomolecular medicine hold that treatment must be based on each patient's individual biochemistry and therefore use sound means of diagnosis with laboratory back tests and data. Practitioners also realize that orthomolecular treatment is essentially a cheap method of treatment that does not necessarily profit big pharma. 

 The scientific consensus view is that for normal individuals, a balanced diet contains all necessary vitamins and minerals, and that routine supplementation is not necessary absent specific diagnosed deficiencies. We believe this is archaic and ignorant thinking in light of decades of clinical evidence that proves otherwise.

This 25 Clock Hour course is a combination of written Lessons and audio lectures.

INTRODUCTORY VIDEO: DR. LINUS PAULING, FATHER OF ORTHOMOLECULAR NUTRITION, CRUSADING SCIENTIST

The triage theory of aging proposes that a single nutrient deficiency will increase age-related diseases because vitamin-dependent proteins and enzymes needed for short term survival processes (breathing, eating, etc.) are protected at the expense of proteins needed for long-term survival processes (immunity, cellular repair, heart function, etc.). Triage comes from the French term, the process of sorting out victims, as of a battle or disaster, to determine medical priorities in order to increase the number of survivors as they live or die. So triage that! All of us have one or more vitamin dependent processes that are running us down sub-optimally. For example, magnesium inadequacy affects over half of the US population and is associated with increased risk for many age-related diseases. I will explain in my usual verbose and lengthy discussions how to diagnose these deficiencies, simply and cheaply, should you care to read on...
  • Msgr. Prof. [Dr. of Med.] Charles McWilliams Msgr. Prof. [Dr. of Med.] Charles McWilliams: Allie Litterer
Can foods be used as medicine? Yes!
When harvested unadulterated, used as juices or as a mono-diet, the enzymes and glycosides of plants become medicines when not deteriorated by intestinal juices and improper food combining. Mono-diets have been used for centuries with proven success. This course explores those ageless principles.
25 clock hours
This course has been praised by many of our past students for over a decade and here is brought to you updated with a block buster Lesson on Iodine; and a complete audio course on Healthology.
50 Clock Hours
     Lesson 0: Linus Pauling from The Atom to The Molecule URL
    LESSON 1: Introduction to Human Nutrition Page
    LESSON 2: Introduction to the Vitamins & Minerals Page
    LESSON 3: THE MINERALS IN HUMAN NUTRITION Page
    LESSON 4: VITAMIN A Page
    LESSON 5: THE B - COMPLEX Page
    LESSON 6: Thiamine - Vitamin B1 Page
    LESSON 7: Riboflavin - Vitamin B2 Page
    LESSON 8: Niacin - Vitamin B3 Page
    LESSON 9: Pantothenic Acid - Vitamin B5 Page
    LESSON 10: Pyridoxine - Vitamin B6 Page
    LESSON 11: Cobalamin - Vitamin B12 Page
    LESSON 12: Biotin - Vitamin B Page
    LESSON 13: Choline - Vitamin B Page
    LESSON 14: Folic Acid Page
    LESSON 15: Inositol - Vitamin B Page
    LESSON 16: Para-aminobenzoic Acid (PABA) Page
    LESSON 17: Pangamic Acid - Vitamin B15 Page
    LESSON 18: Laetril - Vitamin B17 Page
    LESSON 19: Vitamin C - Ascorbic Acid Page
    LESSON 20: Vitamin D - Calciferol Page
    LESSON 21: Vitamin E - Tocopherol Page
    LESSON 22: Vitamin F - Essential Fatty Acids Page
    LESSON 23: Vitamin K Page
    LESSON 24: Vitamin P - Bioflavonoids Page
    LESSON 25: Vitamins T & U Page
    LESSON 26: Overdose on Vitamins? Page
    LESSON 27: Co-Q-10 Page
    LESSON 28: Vitamin H-3 Page
    LESSON 29: Calcium Page
    LESSON 30: Magnesium Page
    LESSON 31: Copper Page
    LESSON 32: IRON Page
    LESSON 33: Orotic Acid, Vitamin B13 Page
    LESSON 34: IDODINE & IODIDE Page
    LESSON 35: Silica Page
    LESSON 36: VITAMIN S [Bonus Lesson, no quiz] Page
    Lesson 37: BONUS - SELENIUM Page
    Lesson 38: Bonus - Alpha Lipoic Acid Page
    Lesson 39: Boron Page
    Lesson 40: Vitamin B11
Essentials of Diet & Nutrition

An introductory course on modern dietetics. Provides the student with a basic scientific understanding of the essential aspects of nutrition, biochemical properties and their interaction with the components of our bodies vital for our health and well-being. Allows the student to make reasonable judgments regarding nutritional claims and fad diets. Provides a basic core of factual data on current controversies regarding food, nutrition and health. Also covers information on food poisoning, additives and flavorings; and specialized topics on fasting, vegetarianism, obesity, alcoholism.

LESSON 1 Aims and Objectives of this Course
LESSON 2 NUTRITION STANDARDS & GUIDELINES
LESSON 3 Modern Lifestyle Challenges
LESSON 4 DIGESTION/ABSORPTION
LESSON 5 DIGESTION & ABSORPTION CONTINUED
LESSON 6 Carbohydrates
LESSON 7 CARBOHYDRATES - Lactose intolerance, Fiber, Probiotics
LESSON 8 CARBOHYDRATES - Blood sugar levels, Sugar controversies
LESSON 9 LIPIDS - Introduction
LESSON 10 NOTES ON LIPIDS
LESSON 11 LIPIDS - continued
LESSON 12 PROTEINS
LESSON 13 PROTEINS continued
LESSON 14 THE FAT-SOLUBLE VITAMINS
LESSON 15 The Water Soluble Vitamins
LESSON 16 THE MINERALS
LESSON 17 THE TRACE MINERALS
LESSON 18 ATP AND ENERGY METABOLISM
LESSON 19-ENERGY BALANCE
LESSON 20-ENERGY BALANCE WEIGHT CONTROL: OBESITY, DIETS
LESSON 21 SPORTS NUTRITION
LESSON 22 FOOD ADDITIVES & SAFETY
LESSON 23 FEEDING THE POOR, CHEAP AND EASY
LESSON 24 EAT CHEAP, STAY HEALTHY


It's a fact. Our soils are depleted and depleted soils do not produce healthy, nutrient-rich plants. If our soils and crops are lacking essential minerals, it's necessary to supplement our diets if we are to achieve true wellness. But will any old multivitamin off the shelves of our grocery or drug store do the trick? All biological organisms (including humans) need organically complexed trace minerals from humates in order to maintain health and prevent disease. Humates, the end result of repetitive plant decomposition, is the required biological step in changing inorganic trace minerals into organically complexed, soluble trace minerals that can be used by both plants, animals, and humans. It is produced in trace amounts by solar degredation, acting upon also soil microorganisms as organic plant matter decays. The process takes hundreds of years and only recently has duplicated in the laboratory. Fulvic and humic acids are extremely small (ultra-chelated), low-molecular-weight molecules that can beneficially modify so many essential biochemical, electrochemical and metabolic processes, and yet, the greater scientific community is still largely ignorant of its role.

Further research in Russia has shown that fulvic and humic acids can be used to resuscitate our soils, thus our food sources and finally, used in our bodies and medicines. This has been accomplished, producing high-quality supplements as our best defense against foods devoid of nutrition to which we have been accustomed for the duration of our lives.