COLLEGE OF MONASTIC MEDICAL PRIESTS - STRUCTURE & FUNCTION
(COLLEGE OF PRIESTS)

 This course requires an enrolment key

COLLEGE OF MONASTIC MEDICAL PRIESTS - STRUCTURE & FUNCTION

With the spread of Christianity and the formation of parishes, the Greek word ἱερεύς (hiereus), and Latin sacerdos, which Christians had since the 3rd century applied to bishops and only in a secondary sense to presbyters, began in the 6th century to be used of presbyters, and is today commonly used of presbyters, distinguishing them from bishops.

Today the term "priest" is used in Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East to refer to those who have been ordained to a ministerial position through receiving the sacrament of Holy Orders. The most significant liturgical acts reserved to priests in these traditions are the administration of the Sacraments, including the celebration of the Holy Mass or Divine Liturgy (the terms for the celebration of the Eucharist in the Latin and Byzantine traditions, respectively), and the Sacrament of Reconciliation, also called Confession. The sacraments of Anointing of the Sick (Extreme Unction) and Confirmation or Chrismation are also administered by priests. In the East, Chrismation is performed by the priest (using oil specially consecrated by a bishop) immediately after confirmation as Priest (Priestess), and Unction is normally performed as a healing ceremony to the sick.

In most Christian traditions, priests wear clerical clothing, a distinctive form of dress. Distinctive clerical clothing is less often worn in modern times than formerly, and in many cases it is rare for a priest to wear it when not acting in a pastoral capacity, especially in countries that view themselves as largely secular in nature.

This course requires an enrolment key